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A bloggers guide to a DSLR

So you’ve bought yourself a DSLR, or a fancy blogging camera to us, now what? Lucky for you, it’s Phriday and we talk all things Photography here. Today we have a beginners guide to a DSLR aimed at bloggers really.

First things first, which DSLR to get. I have a canon 80D, it suit my needs perfectly as a semi-pro camera with great picture quality and a fast shutter speed. It also has a flip out screen and autofocus when in live view mode so it is perfect for filming youtube videos.

The main reason I have this camera is due to having an old canon 1000D and a 60D so I amassed a bunch of leses. Lenses are undoubtably more expensive than cameras so be sure you are choosing the right brand before you commit. I currently have 4 lenses for my camera. There’ll be another lens post soon, as this is just a beginners guide to the DSLR.

The manual myth

So there’s a lot of snobbery around using your camera in manual mode. Lots of bloggers and photographers I know, get the most beautiful pictures while shooting in a non manual or semi manual mode. There are two camera modes I would suggest you start with. AV and TV.

AV

AV means aperture priority. In simple terms this means that you an choose which aperture to shoot in and the camera will decide the best settings.

Aperture decides the depth of field of a shot. The more ‘background blur’ (commonly called bokeh) you want, the lower you want the aperture. When you want more in focus you should use a higher aperture. For product shots when I Want the focus on a specific thing, I tend to use around a f2. For fashion shots I like to have a lot more in focus so use around an f8.

[one-half-first]f1.4[/one-half-first]

[one-half]f9
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TV

TV means shutter speed priority. This means that you choose the amount of time you want the shutter open for, and the camera will decide the rest of the settings. This is great for night time shots, shots of writing using sparklers and other images where you want to capture a lot of light.

There might also be occasions where you need a really fast shutter speed. I know that a lot of my fashion blogger babes like to move quickly getting in a lot of poses in a short time. Having a fast shutter speed enables you to get a lot more of these shots.

[one-half-first]1/8[/one-half-first] [one-half]1/125
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Full manual

There are occasions where you might need to go full manual, i’ll be honest, I very rarely shoot full manual but knowing what each thing does, means that you have the knowledge should you need it.

There are three components here that all manage the amount of light entering the camera:

Aperture

Aperture is denoted by an f number. The higher the number, the less light getting into the camera. The lower the f number the more depth of field you’ll get.

Shutter speed

Pretty self explanatory, the speed the shutter is open for. The longer it’s open the more light gets in.

ISO

I mean, I probably should know what this does other than also lets light in, but the higher the number the more light comes in. The higher the number however, also increases the amount of grain in a photo. Keep this as low as you can for the conditions you have to work with.

[one-half-first] ISO 3200[/one-half-first] [one-half] ISO 400
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2 Comments

  1. October 5, 2018 / 7:08 am

    Amazing article! I love how the photo’s support the explanation.
    I never fully understood what ISO did until I started shooting analog with actual film. I always felt that Aperture and ISO were the same thing but apparently they’re not. I’m not enterally sure about digital but with film ISO is very important and has to do with light sensitivity. I learned the hard way that you can’t shoot with an ISO of 100 and an f/8, all my photo’s came out black haha.

  2. October 5, 2018 / 7:08 am

    Amazing article! I love how the photo’s support the explanation.
    I never fully understood what ISO did until I started shooting analog with actual film. I always felt that Aperture and ISO were the same thing but apparently they’re not. I’m not enterally sure about digital but with film ISO is very important and has to do with light sensitivity. I learned the hard way that you can’t shoot with an ISO of 100 and an f/8, all my photo’s came out black haha.

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